Courses

Fall 2022

Native American Literature (CD or LA)
Subject associations
AMS 322 / ENG 242

An exploration of the written and oral literary traditions of Native American and Indigenous authors. This course offers an occasion to reflect on, critique, and contest settler colonialism or the dispossession of land and waters and the attempt to eliminate Indigenous people. The course will include a service-learning trip to the Munsee Three Sisters Medicinal Farm and an opportunity to learn some Lenape, the ancestral language of New Jersey.

Instructors
Sarah Rivett
Colonial Latin America to 1810 (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 303 / LAS 305

What is colonization? How does it work? What kind of societies does it create? Come find out through the lens of the Latin America. First we study how the Aztec and Inca empires subdued other peoples, and how Muslim Iberia fell to the Christians. Then, we learn about Spanish and Portuguese conquests and how indigenous resistance, adaptation, and racial mixing shaped the continent. You will see gods clash and meld, cities rise and decline, and insurrections fail or win. Silver mines will boom and bust, slaves will toil and rebel; peasants will fight capitalist encroachments. This is a comprehensive view of how Latin America became what it is.

Instructors
Vera S. Candiani
Modern Brazilian History (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 333 / LAS 373 / AAS 335

This course examines the history of modern Brazil from the late colonial period to the present. Lectures, readings, and discussions challenge prevailing narratives about modernity to highlight instead the role played by indigenous and African descendants in shaping Brazilian society. Topics include the meanings of political citizenship; slavery and abolition; race relations; indigenous rights; uneven economic development and Brazil's experiences with authoritarianism and globalization.

Instructors
Isadora M. Mota
The Colonization of North America (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 371

In the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, North America saw the convergence of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans. This course explores the effects of that historic meeting, telling a story that encompasses both well-known events and people (Plymouth Rock, the Pilgrims, Benjamin Franklin), and lesser known stories (the Yamassee War, King Philip's War, the lives of Olaudah Equiano and Mary Rowlandson). Colonization is a bloody, frightening, and fraught endeavor; by the end of this class, you will understand what was won and what was lost, and by whom, in the struggle to control North America.

Instructors
Wendy Warren
Introduction to Latino/a/x Studies (CD or SA)
Subject associations
LAO 201 / AMS 211 / LAS 201

This course provides an introductory foray into the heterogenous field of Latinx Studies, drawing on classical and contemporary texts from sociology, history, political science, feminist studies, and critical race studies. The course explores the following themes: the history of US imperialism in Latin America; decolonial Latinx thought; the criminalization and regulation of Latinx immigration in the US; race, mestizaje, Black identity, and AfroLatinidad identity; colonialism and queerness in Latin America; and liberal, radical, indigenous, and lesbian Latinx feminisms.

Instructors
Staff
Studies in African Performance (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 350 / AFS 350 / ANT 373

This course presents a cross-disciplinary and multi-modal approach to African music, dance, and culture. Co-taught by a master drummer and choreographer (Tarpaga) and an ethnomusicologist (Steingo), students will explore African and African diasporic performance arts through readings, discussions, listening, film analysis, music performance, and composition.

Instructors
Gavin Steingo
Olivier P. Tarpaga
Indigenous North Africa: Amazigh Communities (CD or HA)
Subject associations
NES 251 / AFS 251 / ANT 374

This course exposes students to the historical, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural factors that have shaped Indigenous Amazigh communities in Tamazgha (North Africa) and its diasporas. It examines the role that Amazigh communities have played in revitalizing their cultures in contemporary Tamazgha and makes visible the acknowledgement the Amazighity of lands in North Africa and complexities of language, cultural identity, and colonialism in the region. Many resources in the source will be taken from the instructor's talks with family members, other Indigenous scholars, and activists in the community.

Instructors
Mounia Mnouer
Caribbean Currents (LA)
Subject associations
SPA 316 / LAS 376

The Caribbean has been at the center of modernity and globalization since the 15th century, when European, African, and Asian migrants joined indigenous inhabitants in a violent crucible that produced new cultures, landscapes, rhythms, and political imaginations. This course begins with classic reflections on the Caribbean before centering on recent literature and art from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. Recent works address issues such as debt, migration, climate change, gender, music, and the afterlives of slavery in the region.

Instructors
Rachel L. Price